Journal Club: May 2011

Radiology. 2011 Apr 5. [Epub ahead of print]

CT Colonography in Senior versus Nonsenior Patients: Extracolonic Findings, Recommendations for Additional Imaging, and Polyp Prevalence.

Macari M, Nevsky G, Bonavita J, Kim DC, Megibow AJ, Babb JS.


Abstract

Purpose: To retrospectively evaluate the frequency of recommendations for additional imaging (RAIs) for important extracolonic findings and polyp prevalence among a cohort of seniors (age ≥ 65 years) and nonseniors (age < 65 years) undergoing low-dose computed tomographic (CT) colonography. Materials and Methods: Institutional review board approval was obtained for this HIPAA-compliant retrospective study. Four hundred fifty-four patients (204 nonseniors: mean age, 52 years; 250 seniors: mean age, 69 years) underwent CT colonography at an outpatient facility. Cases were prospectively reported by one of four abdominal radiologists with expertise in CT colonography. The dictated reports were reviewed to determine the frequency of polyps (≥6 mm), the number of extracolonic findings, and the number of RAIs generated. The Fisher exact test was used to compare the percentage of seniors and nonseniors with at least one reported polyp, with at least one extracolonic finding, as well as the frequency of RAIs. Results: The percentage of patients with at least one reported polyp was 14.2% (29 of 204) for the nonsenior group and 13.2% (33 of 250) for seniors, which was not significantly different (P = .772). The percentage of patients with at least one extracolonic finding was 55.4% (113 of 204) for nonseniors and 74.0% (185 of 250) for seniors (P < .0001). The percentage of patients in which an RAI was suggested was 4.4% (nine of 204) for nonseniors and 6.0% (15 of 250) for seniors, which was not significantly different (P = .450). Conclusion: Extracolonic findings were more frequent in seniors than in nonseniors; however, there was no significant difference in the frequency of RAIs between the two groups. © RSNA, 2011 Supplemental material: